eating

 

What we eat is so important. For our health, our politics & economics, for nature, for culture, for our future. And the more we know about where it comes from, how it’s made, who it benefits or harms, what it’s made of and what we make of it, and why we eat this (not that)… the more we can make educated decisions and act in a way that can help shape better futures for all.

 

things to listen to

It’s hard read a book or watch a show while cooking, but one can most definitely listen to music or radio without much difficulty — for me, a podcast is even better. Here are some that I like about eating and food.

 

↠ The Food Programme, BBC Radio 4

This is one of those podcasts that I will clear my listening queue for if a new episode has just been released. As host Sheila Dillon reminds listeners regularly, the show explores all things food — “from culture to cooking, from politics to pleasure”.

 

 

 

The Chefs’ Manifesto Podcast, by the SD2 Advocacy Hub

This podcast brings the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) to life by inviting chefs and relevant experts to have conversations about SDG2: ending hunger, achieving food security and improved nutrition and promoting sustainable agriculture.

 

 

The Food Chain, by the BBC World Service

Reminiscent of the Food Programme in some ways, the Food Chain’s focus lies more on the business side and the science side of food, as well as its cultural significance.

 

 

things to read

I think it is wise to be well-informed on matters that, well, matter. I also think it is sensible to seek out information from many different people, whom each have a lot of experience or done a lot of research on the matter you seek to know more about. Hopefully the reading materials listed below meet that standard.

 

The Way We Eat Now, by Bee Wilson

If you are interested in food beyond eating it, you should get acquainted with Bee Wilson’s work.

 

In Defense of Food, by Michael Pollan

Even if you haven’t read this time-honoured classic, you may well be familiar with its fundamental premise: “Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants.”

 

Sustainable Diets, by Pamela Mason and Tim Lang

This is one that I look forward to reading soon. Professor Tim Lang is most definitely acquainted with the subject of food (at least, at an academic level).

 

Let’s Ask Marion, by Marion Nestle

If anyone can explain what food has to do with politics, it is Marion Nestle.

 

How to Eat, by David L. Katz & Mark Bittman

With so many food- & health-related headlines popping up on our screens every day, one can easily get confused. A doctor and a food writer get together and clear things up.